4 minutes reading time (883 words)

Why your programmers just want to code

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When I interviewed Jamie for a position at ZenTech, he seemed like an enthusiastic engineer. With solid tech skills, ideas for process and product improvement, and a great team attitude, he was the obvious choice.​ I should have noticed the signs. He didn't speak up in retrospectives, he didn't contribute process or product ideas like I expected, and his "team-friendly" interactions were usually sarcastic. He often talked about technical debt, our lack of innovation, and the "stupid" decisions holding us back. An irritating "I told you so" sentiment plagued his comments and feedback.​ Jamie may have thought about leaving the company. If he did, I couldn't tell. Although, I certainly wish he would have. But we were shorthanded, and I needed all the help I could get.
When I interviewed Jamie for a position at ZenTech, he seemed like an enthusiastic engineer. With solid tech skills, ideas for process and product improvement, and a great team attitude, he was the obvious choice.​ I should have noticed the signs. He didn't speak up in retrospectives, he didn't contribute process or product ideas like I expected, and his "team-friendly" interactions were usually sarcastic. He often talked about technical debt, our lack of innovation, and the "stupid" decisions holding us back. An irritating "I told you so" sentiment plagued his comments and feedback.​ Jamie may have thought about leaving the company. If he did, I couldn't tell. Although, I certainly wish he would have. But we were shorthanded, and I needed all the help I could get.
When I interviewed Jamie for a position at ZenTech, he seemed like an enthusiastic engineer. With solid tech skills, ideas for process and product improvement, and a great team attitude, he was the obvious choice.​ I should have noticed the signs. He didn't speak up in retrospectives, he didn't contribute process or product ideas like I expected, and his "team-friendly" interactions were usually sarcastic. He often talked about technical debt, our lack of innovation, and the "stupid" decisions holding us back. An irritating "I told you so" sentiment plagued his comments and feedback.​ Jamie may have thought about leaving the company. If he did, I couldn't tell. Although, I certainly wish he would have. But we were shorthanded, and I needed all the help I could get.
When I interviewed Jamie for a position at ZenTech, he seemed like an enthusiastic engineer. With solid tech skills, ideas for process and product improvement, and a great team attitude, he was the obvious choice.​ I should have noticed the signs. He didn't speak up in retrospectives, he didn't contribute process or product ideas like I expected, and his "team-friendly" interactions were usually sarcastic. He often talked about technical debt, our lack of innovation, and the "stupid" decisions holding us back. An irritating "I told you so" sentiment plagued his comments and feedback.​ Jamie may have thought about leaving the company. If he did, I couldn't tell. Although, I certainly wish he would have. But we were shorthanded, and I needed all the help I could get.
When I interviewed Jamie for a position at ZenTech, he seemed like an enthusiastic engineer. With solid tech skills, ideas for process and product improvement, and a great team attitude, he was the obvious choice.​ I should have noticed the signs. He didn't speak up in retrospectives, he didn't contribute process or product ideas like I expected, and his "team-friendly" interactions were usually sarcastic. He often talked about technical debt, our lack of innovation, and the "stupid" decisions holding us back. An irritating "I told you so" sentiment plagued his comments and feedback.​ Jamie may have thought about leaving the company. If he did, I couldn't tell. Although, I certainly wish he would have. But we were shorthanded, and I needed all the help I could get.
When I interviewed Jamie for a position at ZenTech, he seemed like an enthusiastic engineer. With solid tech skills, ideas for process and product improvement, and a great team attitude, he was the obvious choice.​ I should have noticed the signs. He didn't speak up in retrospectives, he didn't contribute process or product ideas like I expected, and his "team-friendly" interactions were usually sarcastic. He often talked about technical debt, our lack of innovation, and the "stupid" decisions holding us back. An irritating "I told you so" sentiment plagued his comments and feedback.​ Jamie may have thought about leaving the company. If he did, I couldn't tell. Although, I certainly wish he would have. But we were shorthanded, and I needed all the help I could get.
When I interviewed Jamie for a position at ZenTech, he seemed like an enthusiastic engineer. With solid tech skills, ideas for process and product improvement, and a great team attitude, he was the obvious choice.​ I should have noticed the signs. He didn't speak up in retrospectives, he didn't contribute process or product ideas like I expected, and his "team-friendly" interactions were usually sarcastic. He often talked about technical debt, our lack of innovation, and the "stupid" decisions holding us back. An irritating "I told you so" sentiment plagued his comments and feedback.​ Jamie may have thought about leaving the company. If he did, I couldn't tell. Although, I certainly wish he would have. But we were shorthanded, and I needed all the help I could get.
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Wednesday, 17 October 2018